manchester
BRIGGS ACCORDIONS
lancashire
 
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With some accordions it’s been known for levers to break with use. The design for the levers used in the BRIGGS accordion is a result of thorough development and testing. The bench testing jig shown above was used as part of this process to ensure the lever wouldn’t break even after many years of playing. An early version did indeed break during testing. However, a slight change was made to the design and this version, which is the final design as used in the instrument, survived many million simulated button-presses without failing. It’s this attention to detail in the design and making of this instrument which will ensure that it will play like new for many years to come.
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